same-sex marriage

Arizona reviewing records laws now that same-sex marriage is legal

Arizona reviewing records laws now that same-sex marriage is legal

The Arizona Department of Health Services is reviewing the state’s vital records law now that same-sex marriage is legal under a federal court ruling.

Health Services Director Will Humble says a spouse will be able to get a death certificate for a spouse regardless of gender.

Humble says his department doesn’t expect major changes in how it issues birth certificates.

But he says maternity and paternity laws are being reviewed to determine how to register a birth when a birth mother wants her same-sex spouse listed on the birth certificate as the other parent. Read more »

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Phoenix leaders say gay-marriage ruling good for business

Phoenix leaders say gay-marriage ruling good for business

Opponents of gay marriage, including Gov.Jan Brewer and Catholic bishops, criticized the judge's decision. Brewer said that with its decision, the court was eroding the people's power and overstepping its bounds. Brewer noted that Arizona voters in 2008 approved a state constitutional amendment to define marriage as a union of one man and one woman.

We asked: What impact do you think the ruling legalizing same-sex marriage will have in Phoenix? Please indicate whether you support or oppose the decision. Read more »

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Maricopa County marriage licenses up after same-sex ruling

Maricopa County marriage licenses up after same-sex ruling

While Arizona's most populous county gave out more than triple the average number of marriage licenses after same-sex marriage became legal last week, other counties saw no uptick at all.

Maricopa County issued marriage licenses to 292 couples last Friday and 184 on Monday, up from an average of 98 each business day.

In Pima County, Arizona's second-most populous and home to Tucson, clerks issued an average of 60 licenses each day through Tuesday, up from an average of 25 this time of year.

Officially, no one tracks the gender of applicant couples, and neither county informally recorded the number of same-sex couples. Read more »

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Utah Supreme Court Lifts Hold On Same-Sex Adoptions

Utah's Supreme Court lifted its stay on same-sex adoptions Thursday, two weeks after the state dropped its legal fight over the issue.

In May, the state's high court placed a hold on several district judges' rulings that ordered the Utah Department of Health to issue birth certificates to same-sex couples who were adopting children. The stay halted any movement on the issue until judges could decide whether or not the adoptions were legal under state law.

Thursday's ruling clears the way for those adoptions to proceed. Read more »

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Memo to clerks: You can object to gay marriage

Memo to clerks: You can object to gay marriage

The conservative group that handled the legal defense of Arizona's overturned gay-marriage ban is advising court clerks they don't have to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples if the clerk has religious or moral objections.

Four days after same-sex couples were allowed to marry for the first time in Arizona, the Maricopa County Clerk of the Court's Office said one employee has already made such a request. And the issue may be headed for the legislative agenda. Read more »

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Obama: 'I Think The Equal Protection Clause Does Guarantee Same-Sex Marriage' In All States

President Barack Obama seems to have changed his tune on gay marriage, telling The New Yorker's Jeffrey Toobin he believes same-sex couples in all 50 states should be allowed to marry under the equal protection clause of the Constitution.

Obama first publicly backed gay marriage in May 2012, but noted he thought the issue should be left to the states. Speaking with Toobin for the Oct. 27 issue of The New Yorker, Obama said the best Supreme Court decision since he took office was the recent rejection of gay marriage appeals from five states, a move the president said is "a consequential and powerful signal of the changes that have taken place in society and that the law is having to catch up." Read more »

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Ariz. businesses celebrate gay marriage with discounts, deals

Ariz. businesses celebrate gay marriage with discounts, deals

Businesses in Arizona seized on the lift of the gay-marriage ban as a marketing opportunity, offering discounts to same-sex couples on everything from bar tabs to hair stylings to hotel stays.

Social-media accounts began humming with electronic deals for gay couples minutes after Arizona Attorney General Tom Horne announced he would not appeal a U.S. District Court decision striking down the state's ban.

"Let the honeymoon food come to you," read a promotion for Sunfare, a Deer Valley-area company that delivers specialized meals Valley-wide. "Sign up for Sunfare anytime this week for 25 percent off your first three family dinners." Read more »

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Next Gay Marriage Fight: Religious Exemptions

Next Gay Marriage Fight: Religious Exemptions

Alarmed by the broad expansion of same-sex marriage set in motion by the U.S. Supreme Court, religious conservatives are moving their fight to state legislatures — seeking exemptions that would allow some groups, companies and people with religious objections to refuse benefits or service for gay spouses.

But winning sweeping carve-outs for faith-affiliated adoption agencies or individual wedding vendors will be an uphill battle. Public attitudes against exceptions have hardened, and efforts by faith groups in states where courts, not lawmakers, recognized same-sex unions have had little success. Read more »

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More gay people can now get legally married. They can still be legally fired.

More gay people can now get legally married. They can still be legally fired.

With the Supreme Court’s refusal earlier Monday to hear a series of cases on same-sex marriage, the movement for LGBT rights in the United States has taken a completely unexpected turn: Gay people can now get legally married in more states than where they are legally protected from job discrimination.  As this map shows, there are now five states — Indiana, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Utah, and Virginia — where gay people can get legally married and where it is perfectly legal for an employer to fire someone for being gay. Read more »

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60 Percent Of Americans Soon Will Live In States With Marriage Equality

60 Percent Of Americans Soon Will Live In States With Marriage Equality

The Supreme Court on Monday set the United States on a historic civil rights path, paving the way for the majority of Americans to reside in states where same-sex marriage is legal.

The court declined to hear appeals from five states that were challenging lower-court rulings legalizing same-sex marriage. By passing on that debate, the court gave a final legal stamp of approval to marriage equality in five states: Indiana, Utah, Oklahoma, Virginia and Wisconsin. It also set the stage for legalization in six other states that also fall under the lower courts' jurisdiction: Colorado, Wyoming, West Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. Read more »

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