Marriage Act

Utah Gay Marriage Ban Struck Down As Unconstitutional

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A federal judge struck down Utah's same-sex marriage ban Friday in a decision that brings a nationwide shift toward allowing gay marriage to a conservative state where the Mormon church has long been against it.

The Salt Lake County clerk's office started issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples. Deputy Clerk Dahnelle Burton-Lee said the district attorney authorized her office to begin issuing the licenses but she couldn't immediately say how many have been issued so far.

Just hours earlier, U.S. District Judge Robert J. Shelby issued a 53-page ruling saying Utah's law passed by voters in 2004 violates gay and lesbian couples' rights to due process and equal protection under the 14th Amendment. Read more »

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Gay Marriage Battle Nears End in Hawaii, the First Front Line

Gay Marriage Battle Nears End in Hawaii, the First Front Line

HONOLULU — When, as most everyone expects, Gov. Neil Abercrombie signs into law same-sex marriage here in the coming days, it may almost seem like a routine event. Hawaii is poised to be among 16 states to approve gay marriage, along with Illinois and shortly after Minnesota, New Jersey and Rhode Island.

Opponents of a measure to legalize gay marriage gathered Thursday at the Capitol in Honolulu. Read more »

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Financial Considerations for Gay Families in Light of DOMA Demise

Financial Considerations for Gay Families in Light of DOMA Demise

On June 26, the Supreme Court repealed the 1996 Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). DOMA essentially said that even gay couples who were legally married at the state level, weren’t recognized as such at the federal level (and weren’t entitled to its marriage benefits). With DOMA since being repealed, gay couples now have additional financial rights.

Which issues does this ruling affect in particular?

The ruling affects a multitude of issues. Read more »

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Finishing the Job: DOMA Repeal Bill Reintroduced

Finishing the Job: DOMA Repeal Bill Reintroduced

Now that the U.S Supreme Court has struck down one part of the Defense of Marriage Act, members of Congress have reintroduced legislation to finish the job.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler of New York introduced the Respect for Marriage Act in the House today, and Dianne Feinstein of California introduced it in the Senate. Both are Democrats, but the measure does have some Republican support. The 160 House cosponsors include Republicans Ileana Ros-Lehtinen of Florida and Richard Hanna of New York. The 41 Senate cosponsors are all Democrats or independents. Read more »

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DOMA’s Demise Celebrated by Apple, Other Top Tech Firms

DOMA’s Demise Celebrated by Apple, Other Top Tech Firms

In a pair of 5-4 decisions, the Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled in favor of same-sex couples in two major cases, effectively allowing federal benefits for gay couples and clearing the way for same-sex marriages in the state of California.

One ruling overturned the Defense of Marriage Act, or DOMA, the bill passed in 1996 that ruled same-sex marriages unconstitutional. The other decision left intact a lower-court ruling that invalidated California’s Prop. 8 ban on same-sex marriage.

Among progressive Silicon Valley tech companies, the reaction was incredibly positive. Read more »

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Statement by the President on the Supreme Court Ruling on the Defense of Marriage Act

I applaud the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act.  This was discrimination enshrined in law.  It treated loving, committed gay and lesbian couples as a separate and lesser class of people.  The Supreme Court has righted that wrong, and our country is better off for it.  We are a people who declared that we are all created equal – and the love we commit to one another must be equal as well.  Read more »

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Supreme Court arguments over Defense of Marriage Act echo in Valley

Supreme Court arguments over Defense of Marriage Act echo in Valley

Video Story
By Lauren Ettlinger

Wednesday, March 27, 2013

For two Arizona women, Supreme Court arguments over the Defense of Marriage Act have a personal impact: They were married in California, but could be denied federal benefits if the law is allowed to stand. Cronkite News reporter Lauren Ettlinger has the story.

To hear their story, click here!

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On marriage, America's business leaders say ‘equal is equal’

On marriage, America's business leaders say ‘equal is equal’

This week, more than 250 major corporations, cities and employers declared that same-sex marriage ought to be recognized under federal law everywhere in the United States. What brought about this dramatic shift? And why do some of America’s leading conservative institutions today embrace marriage equality?

That story actually began over three decades ago.

For the owners of the Village Voice in 1982, it was a simple question. Should we consider same-sex couples equally with married opposite sex couples when it comes to offering health care and other workplace benefits?

Yes, they agreed. Read more »

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US Supreme Court to Hear Americans for Equal Rights Challenge to Prop 8 on November 30th

From Americans for Equal Rights:

We just received word from the U.S. Supreme Court that it will discuss whether to hear AFER’s federal constitutional challenge to California’s Proposition 8 at its private Conference on Friday, November 30. 

The Court will also consider on that date whether it will hear one or more challenges to the so-called Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). Both the Prop. 8 case and the DOMA cases had previously been distributed for discussion at the Justices’ November 20 Conference.

Be the first to find out what the Supreme Court decides. Sign up for breaking news updates from AFER. Read more »

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Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Gay Marriage Likely To Go Before Supreme Court Within The Next Year

Ruth Bader Ginsburg: Gay Marriage Likely To Go Before Supreme Court Within The Next Year

BOULDER, Colo. -- Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said Wednesday that she believes the Defense of Marriage Act will likely go to the U.S. Supreme Court within the next year.

Ginsburg spoke at the University of Colorado in Boulder. She was asked a student-submitted question about the equal-protection clause and whether the nation's high court would consider it applying to sexual orientation.

Ginsburg said with a smile that she couldn't answer the question. She said she could not talk about matters that would come to the court, and that the Defense of Marriage Act would probably be up soon.

"I think it's most likely that we will have that issue before the court toward the end of the current term," she said. Read more »

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