Human Rights Campaign

Bias against gays: It's bad for business — and us all

Bias against gays: It's bad for business — and us all

July Fourth is more than just a holiday. It's a statement about the values we hold as Arizonans and Westerners, the freedom to make our own choices, live our own live and look forward to a better Arizona.

More than 70 percent of Arizonans believe there is equality in places of employment for all in our state. Unfortunately, this is not the reality. Today, in Arizona, you can still be fired for who you are and who you may love. Read more »

shadow

Picture it, an all-out grim legal environment for citizens who happen to be lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender: Criminalization of homosexual acts, bans on open military service recognition of married same-sex couples; no nationwide hate crimes or basic employment protections.

This isn't Russia or Uganda or another country that seems to be constantly in the news for its anti-LGBT posture. It's the United States, circa 2002. Read more »

shadow

Obama says to bar LGBT discrimination by federal contractors

Obama says to bar LGBT discrimination by federal contractors

President Barack Obama said on Tuesday he will sign an executive order barring federal contractors from discriminating against employees based on their sexual orientation, but told gay rights activists they need to keep up the pressure on Congress to pass a broader law.

Drawing a lengthy standing ovation from a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) gala raising money for the Democratic National Committee, Obama said the order was the right thing to do for human rights and the economy.

"We don't benefit as a country or an economy - businesses don't benefit - if they're leaving talent off the field," Obama said. Read more »

shadow

BP's Former CEO Explains Why LGBT Equality Makes Good Business Sense

BP's Former CEO Explains Why LGBT Equality Makes Good Business Sense

On 2 June 2013, I wrote an editorial in the Financial Times arguing the case for gay marriage. The House of Lords would vote on a measure legalising same-sex marriage the following day. I supported the bill as a pragmatic legislator, as a gay man and as a human being. But I also supported it because I am a businessman.

Business does not usually take a position on the institution of marriage. But, in my time as chief executive, I learned that any policy that fosters an inclusive environment makes good business sense. Paul Reed, my former colleague at BP and now a senior executive there, puts it best: "I don’t want people saving a quarter of their brain to hide who they are. I want them to apply their whole brain to their job." Read more »

shadow

New Report Documents Unfair Treatment on the Job for LGBT Workers

New Report Documents Unfair Treatment on the Job for LGBT Workers

Despite the fact that the overwhelming majority of Americans support workplace nondiscrimination protections for LGBT individuals, there is no federal law mandating these protections and less than half of states ban discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

A Broken Bargain: Unchecked Discrimination Against LGBT Workers is a new report which documents the struggles that LGBT workers continue to face on the job. There is still a hiring bias that makes it more difficult for LGBT workers to secure good jobs and they also disproportionately experience unfair firing and on-the-job inequality. Additionally, severe wage disparities and penalties exist making it harder for LGBT workers to provide for themselves and their loved ones. Read more »

shadow

Yay for same-sex marriage, but ...

Yay for same-sex marriage, but ...

There's plenty of gay-rights news to celebrate this week:

-- On Monday, a federal judge threw out Oregon's ban on same-sex marriages, writing that his decision was one in support of "families committed to the common purpose of love, devotion and service to the greater community."

-- On Tuesday, the same thing, more or less, happened in Pennsylvania, with a judge in that case writing that "we are a better people than what these laws represent, and it is time to discard them into the ash heap of history." (I mean, wow, right?) Read more »

shadow

Wall Street CEOs open up about their gay sons

Wall Street CEOs open up about their gay sons

In the "boy's club" of Wall Street, some top executives' views on gay rights changed entirely when the issue became personal.

That is, when their own adult children came out of the closet.

When he was CEO of Morgan Stanley and Credit Suisse First Boston, John Mack was known for his progressive views on lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender equality.

But that wasn't always the case.

"I had strong views of being anti-gay," Mack said this month at a conference hosted by Out on the Street, an organization that helps firms recruit and retain LGBT talent. Growing up and playing football in a small town in North Carolina, Mack said he "was unfair, and in some cases downright cruel." Read more »

shadow

Why Gay Workers Decide to Stay in the Closet

Why Gay Workers Decide to Stay in the Closet

At Boston University, Rebecca Farmer was active in the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. But when it came time to pursue a career in finance, the 23-year-old decided to stay in the closet.

Through six internships and the start of her first job in a rotational training program at financial-services firm UBS AG, she stayed quiet when conversations turned personal.

"It was fear of being negatively perceived," Ms. Farmer said. "I was more concerned about the people I sit next to, not the company itself." Read more »

shadow

Gay Rights Push Shifts Its Focus South and West

Gay Rights Push Shifts Its Focus South and West

The country’s leading gay rights groups and donors, after a decade focused on legalizing same-sex marriage, are embarking on a major drive to win more basic civil rights and workplace protections in Southern and Western states where the rapid progress of the movement has largely eluded millions of gay men and lesbians.

The effort will shift tens of millions of dollars in the next few years to what advocates described as the final frontier for gay rights: states like Mississippi, Georgia, Arkansas and Texas, where Republicans dominate elected office and traditional cultural views on homosexuality still prevail. Read more »

shadow