All Things Long Term Care

FOOD SAFETY FOR SUMMER COOKOUTS

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Barbecues and pool parties with family and friends often top the list summer activities. But, cooking outside can lead to bacteria growth and food-borne illness Cathy Cochran, a food safety expert at the United States Department of Agriculture, warns that the warmer months are prime time for growing bacteria. “Food-borne illness does peak in the summer time; that’s partially because bacteria does grow fastest in warm temperatures but also because people are cooking away from their refrigerators.” Read more »

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FOOD SAFETY FOR SUMMER COOKOUTS

BBQ1

Barbecues and pool parties with family and friends often top the list summer activities. But, cooking outside can lead to bacteria growth and food-borne illness Cathy Cochran, a food safety expert at the United States Department of Agriculture, warns that the warmer months are prime time for growing bacteria. “Food-borne illness does peak in the summer time; that’s partially because bacteria does grow fastest in warm temperatures but also because people are cooking away from their refrigerators.” Read more »

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KNOW YOUR SOURCE WHEN ORDERING PRESCRIPTIONS ONLINE

A 2007-2010 study by the CDC found that people age 65 and older took an average of 5+ prescription drugs.  Their research also found that the cost of prescription medications has been rising.  The financial burden can be overwhelming, especially for those on a fixed income, and has led many to look for cheaper alternatives over the internet. Read more »

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KNOW YOUR SOURCE WHEN ORDERING PRESCRIPTIONS ONLINE

A 2007-2010 study by the CDC found that people age 65 and older took an average of 5+ prescription drugs.  Their research also found that the cost of prescription medications has been rising.  The financial burden can be overwhelming, especially for those on a fixed income, and has led many to look for cheaper alternatives over the internet. Read more »

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THE SECRET TO LONGEVITY

According to the Centers for Disease Control, in 1920 the average life expectancy was 54. Today, it is 78. So, what is the secret?

The Longevity Project, a book based on an 8 decade long study at Stanford University, found that “conscientious people” tend to live longer. A conscientious person is more likely to obey rules, seek healthy relationships, and avoid risky situations.

“Most people who live to an old age do so not because they have beaten cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or lung disease; rather, the long-lived have mostly avoided serious ailments altogether,” said authors Howard S. Friedman and Leslie R. Martin. Read more »

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THE SECRET TO LONGEVITY

According to the Centers for Disease Control, in 1920 the average life expectancy was 54. Today, it is 78. So, what is the secret?

The Longevity Project, a book based on an 8 decade long study at Stanford University, found that “conscientious people” tend to live longer. A conscientious person is more likely to obey rules, seek healthy relationships, and avoid risky situations.

“Most people who live to an old age do so not because they have beaten cancer, heart disease, diabetes, or lung disease; rather, the long-lived have mostly avoided serious ailments altogether,” said authors Howard S. Friedman and Leslie R. Martin. Read more »

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MEDICAL STUDIES LACK SENIOR PARTICIPATION

Experimental studies are critical to advancing medical treatments and drugs, however recent statistics have shown that the senior population is underrepresented. Seniors are often omitted from controlled testing because of complicated health conditions or for fear they will increase the risk of side effects.

In a recent New York Times article, Stanford researchers Dr. Donna Zulman and Dr. Keith Humphreys write, “As clinicians who care for older patients ourselves, we want to make sure that we’re giving them the best treatment possible. But we can’t do that if we don’t have evidence for what works and what doesn’t.”

Click here to read more Read more »

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MEDICAL STUDIES LACK SENIOR PARTICIPATION

Experimental studies are critical to advancing medical treatments and drugs, however recent statistics have shown that the senior population is underrepresented. Seniors are often omitted from controlled testing because of complicated health conditions or for fear they will increase the risk of side effects.

In a recent New York Times article, Stanford researchers Dr. Donna Zulman and Dr. Keith Humphreys write, “As clinicians who care for older patients ourselves, we want to make sure that we’re giving them the best treatment possible. But we can’t do that if we don’t have evidence for what works and what doesn’t.”

Click here to read more Read more »

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